Reading magic : why reading aloud to our children will change their lives forever /

Main Author: Fox, Mem, 1946-
Other Authors: Horacek, Judy.
Format: Book
Language: English
Published: San Diego : Harcourt, c2001.
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Review by Booklist Review

In a cheerful, chatty style that's totally jargon-free, children's picture-book author Fox makes a passionate case for reading aloud to children "as long as they'll let us, even after they can finally read themselves." She tells us how to do it well and why. Her small, spacious book is no pedagogical tome, although she does quote experts when it suits her. She's fiercely critical of the phonics-only approach to literacy and the "See Spot run" kind of basal readers. Instead, she conveys her wild enthusiasm for reading aloud the best children's books, reading them over and over again, for the story and the music, the bonding between child and reader, the love of words that is the best step into reading. Her examples are personal, many from her own family and friends and from her own books, and occasional cartoons by Judy Horacek add to the fun. Give this to new parents and also to the many teachers and children's librarians who will appreciate the clear, joyful talk about what they do. --Hazel Rochman

From Booklist, Copyright (c) American Library Association. Used with permission.
Review by Publisher's Weekly Review

Two books for adults pay tribute to children's books and to the artists and writers who create them. In Reading Magic: Why Reading Aloud to Our Children Will Change Their Lives Forever, bestselling picture book author Mem Fox extols the benefits of reading to preschoolers even newborns and gives suggestions for helping children learn to read by themselves. Line drawings by Judy Horacek inject some levity. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Review by Library Journal Review

This rah-rah book on the benefits of reading aloud to children does not present many new ideas. People interested in reading aloud are probably already intuitively doing the things recommended here. It is not clear for whom Fox, author of numerous children's books and adult books dealing with literacy, wrote this work. Perhaps for those poor souls who've never been read to and don't know how to begin. Fox offers tips on how to read most effectively, reminding parents that they should always be playful. Comments about reading as it is taught in school and the influence of television are well taken. Unfortunately, she dispenses with the whole word vs. phonics debate in one paragraph. There is no documentation to support any of her assertions regarding how children learn, nor is there a bibliography. A marginal purchase for public libraries. Margaret Cardwell, Christian Brothers Univ., Memphis, TN (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Review by School Library Journal Review

Beginning with copious suggestions and ideas for preparing and presenting the scripts, Fredericks then provides directions for staging, using props, delivery, and post presentations. Scripts are presented in five parts and cover the land and early people of North America, the beginnings of a new nation, changes in the 19th century, new directions of the 20th century, and the recent challenges of the 20th and 21st centuries. A list of possible extensions to continue the historical lesson through research and discussion follows each script. Dialogue is simple yet engaging enough for students. Most scripts involve anywhere from 4 to 10 characters. Students should find American history more meaningful through fun and active participation in historical events, becoming major characters of history, and developing the ability to communicate through storytelling via readers theatre.-Susan Shaver, Hemingford Public Schools, NE (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Review by Booklist Review


Review by Publisher's Weekly Review


Review by Library Journal Review


Review by School Library Journal Review